WINDOWS OF THE WORLD



STUDIO: asia architecture & urbanism study abroad
YEAR: four (4)
DATE: october, 2010

BLOG: urban gorilla
LOCATION: shenzhen, china
A few days ago, a few of us visited Windows of the World, a Shenzhen amusement park that contains 130 scaled reproductions of some of the most famous tourist attractions in the world. Walking around the park was one of the most bizarre and ironic experiences I've had. In one view-frame would be superimposed in layers: New York Manhattan Island, the Easter Egg Islands, the Volcano's of Hawaii, an Aztec Temple, the statue O Cristo Redentor in Rio de Janeiro, and the backdrop of Shenzhen high-rises. Five minutes' walk later I would be greeted with the Egyptian pyramids at one-third scale next to the Eiffel Tower and the park monorail. The more and more I was bombarded with these peculiar and completely laughable scenes, the more the issue of authenticity versus falsity begged to be considered. In Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, Walter Benjamin states that "Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where it happens to be." By this argument, these scaled replicas - reproductions of the original 'art' or the historic relics themselves - are not 'real' because they lack the very context and history that conditioned the original building artifact.



Windows of the World brings to mind a similar urban phenomenon more familiar to Westerners: Las Vegas. Albeit at a larger scale, Las Vegas also contains a small scale Eiffel Tower (The Venetian), roman palaces (Caesar's Palace), the New York skyline (New York-New York), and the Egyptian pyramids (Luxor).Like Windows of the World, It contains physical imitations of the original, but unlike Windows of the World, I would argue it is entirely more 'real' because it doesn't profess to replicate but rather references the original. One visits Las Vegas as a form of escapism, whereas one visits Windows of the World to see replicas. This is also an issue of identity. Vegas exists as its own entity, contains its own unique character. Does Windows of the World have a persona even though the objects that make it up lack a "presence in time and space"?



Perhaps it is the very absence of contextual presence that in itself gives 'identity' to Windows of the World. As our group entered the park, the main sign outside the amusement park stated in bright letters "Welcome to our World". At first I found the sign to be completely comical and ironic: how is a representation of the artifacts of all the other countries of the earth in any way unique to 'their' world. But the more I thought of it, the more I realized that the very fact that this replicated collection of other worlds coexist in these few physical acres becomes in fact a new 'world'. In Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, Walter Benjamin further points out that "an ancient statue of Venus, for example, stood in a different traditional context with the Greeks, who made it an object of veneration, than with the clerics of the Middle Ages, who viewed it as an ominous idol." Benjamin is stating that the same physical object when situated in different contexts take on different significances based on the environment that imposes those meanings on the object. The same can be said for Windows of the World. These historical artifacts no longer carry any of their original spatial or temporal contexts but rather have taken on completely new ones, meanings that have been imposed on them by their current environment, that of Shenzhen. Windows of the World and the replicas within have embraced a completely new identity, uniquely as a representation of Shenzhen - just as the Luxor, Caesar's, and The Venetian have come to be known collectively as Las Vegas.

// Evan Shieh





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